Why I attend Mathematical Problems in Industry (MPI) workshops

Hangjie Ji, Duke University I have found that it is very easy for graduate students to get immersed in their own filtered and narrowed research area without thinking about how to use their expertise in other applications. During my Ph.D. study in mathematics I was an active participant in several industrial workshops where graduate students have the opportunity to work in teams on real problems. In this post I will share my experiences at these workshops.

A random walk toward a net positive

Derek Kane, Deka Research and Development Avoiding boredom was my earliest career goal. My undergraduate degree was mechanical engineering, and my brother got me a job with him at Itek Optical Systems. Itek made cameras and telescopes, largely for the Department of Defense. The engineering challenges were fascinating, but the analysis and algorithm aspects of the work excited me much more than traditional mechanical engineering. However, my lack of deep mathematical training limited the analyses and algorithm development I could handle. At this job, I also noticed two career paths: one group of older engineers became middle managers whose work looked unbearably dull and who seemed very vulnerable to layoffs. A smaller group of engineers, including my boss, served as technical experts. When a new and innovative solution was required, or when a program stalled because a physical or computational challenge could not be overcome, these experts were consulted. I wanted this job.

Academia trained me for a BIG career

Peter D. Horn I am honored to share some career advice with the young and mathematically-inclined. When I fit that description, I felt a lack of diversity in the opinions and advice I was hearing from my mentors. This wasn't their fault, but mine. Classic case of selection bias, as I only sought advice from my professors.  My first recommendation is to connect with many math folks who have walked a variety of paths to get a sense of what is out there (reading the posts on this blog is a great first step!). When I was finishing up my math major, I felt there was more math for me to learn, and I went on to get a PhD in low-dimensional topology. As a grad student, I was encouraged to pursue a postdoc. By the time I was deep into my postdoc, I had a tenure-track job in my sights. It wasn't until my third year into a tenure-track position that I evaluated my career choice and realized I would be happier doing something else.

5 CS skills I wish I learned in college

Lindsay Hall, Software Engineer (Google NYC) I started working full-time as a software engineer (SWE) at Google NYC in 2012, after graduating from Harvey Mudd College with a degree in Math and Computer Science. Prior to joining full-time, I did 3 SWE internships with Google, working at YouTube in the San Bruno office and with the Google Docs team in NYC. By the time I did my first technical interview with Google, I was fortunate enough to have learned the skills and topics usually covered in these interviews, which tend to focus on coding, algorithms, and data structures. In general, if you can pass a Google technical interview, you can learn the rest of the skills on the job, but there are some key areas where I wish I’d been better prepared in college.

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